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Also Available for Lou Hoover: Charles Henry's grandfather, an immigrant from Ireland, helped to found the town of Wooster, Ohio. His father was superintendent of Ohio Bitumen Coal in nearby Massillon. His widowed mother relocated with him and his older brother to Iowa, where he found work as a book-keeper in a bank, thus beginning his lifelong work in various capacities in banks.

Once he had helped establish a bank in Monterey, California, Henry became a partner in the bank and found the financial success that had eluded him for so long. As a young woman, she worked as a clerk in a dry goods store in Waterloo. Although both of Lou Hoover's parents were born in Wooster, Ohio, they both migrated, separately, with their families to Iowa, where they married.

Lou Hoover's paternal great-grandfather William Henry was an immigrant from Ireland. Among other branches of her ancestors were those born in several of the original thirteen New England and Mid-Atlantic colonies; original immigrants and their points of known origin include: She also had ancestors who fought in the American Revolution.

Episcopalian; although she remained a member of the faith in which she was raised, she attended Quaker services with her husband, the faith in which he was raised. Through her paternal ancestors, however, Lou Hoover did have a Quaker heritage. One of her uncles several generations back, John Woolman was a prominent Quaker preacher, peace advocate and civic leader. Five foot, eight inches; blue eyes; light brown hair which was white by the time she was First Lady.

Kindergarten, Waterloo, Iowa, Los Angeles Normal School An active student, she joined a school club, named after a teacher, which had members gathering small animals, rock formations and other samples of the natural world, for display in the school.

She chose the school, in part, for its emphasis on physical activity even for women students and because the institution had what she said was "the best gymnasium west of the Mississippi. San Jose Normal School , Lou Henry Hoover earned her teaching certificate, intending to pursue education as a profession as her mother had. Stanford University , graduating with a B. Lou Henry was the first woman in America to have earned a degree in geology from Stanford.

Her study had begun when, after attending a lecture by Stanford professor of geology J. Branner, she asked it he would accept a woman student. He, as well as her parents, encouraged her to pursue the field of study. Although born in Waterloo, Iowa, Lou Henry Hoover lived in other states during her youth, as her father sought more lucrative employment, first at Corsicana, Texas , then returning to Waterloo, and then briefly to Clearwater, Kansas The family finally settled in California, living first in Whittier , then Los Angeles both in southern California, and then finally in Monterey , in northern California.

Lou Henry was consciously raised by both parents in a manner unconventional for young girls in that era. Along with being socialized to assume traditionally feminine traits, both parents encouraged her love of physical exercise and sports. She played baseball in the street, basketball, and enjoyed archery, boating, sledding, roller-skating and ice-skating. Most especially, however, she enjoyed being her father's companion in the outdoors, hiking, fishing, and camping; her lifelong love of outdoor physical exertion was borne at this time.

Her father also introduced her to business issues. She was also to become an expert horsewoman, riding bareback and in the formal English style, including sidesaddle. Despite her Midwestern roots, Lou Hoover considered herself a westerner.

She took to the outdoors lifestyle of California, deepening her exploration and knowledge of the natural world. Her father continued to educate her on geological formations, plant-life, even the safety and edibility of nuts, ferns and other foods found in forests and canyons. She also learned to hunt rabbit. She also began a lifelong interest in the native culture and history of California, including a nearly-professional study of architecture. As a young woman, she also showed an interest in larger public issues, as illustrated by two school essays she wrote at the age of It was during a brief period when she was working as a clerk in the bank now run by her father in Monterey, that her academic pursuit of geology was prompted following a Stanford University professor's lecture on the subject.

Although she was never employed as a miner or geologist, she had a professional perspective on the field as both a student and wife of a professional in the field; she later became a member of the Women's Auxiliary of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers. She also had a faculty with linguistics. She learned Latin at Stanford and, when going to live in China, learned Mandarin Chinese by training with a tutor.

During the White House years, she was known to communicate with the President in a few words of Chinese he did not speak it as fluently as she when they wished to keep their conversation private. In time, she was to be fluent in five languages, including Spanish, Italian, and French. She also had a short stint as a substitute teacher in a public schoolhouse just next to the Monterey Mission. During her first year at Stanford, her professor, J.

Branner introduced Lou Henry to his assistant, senior class member Herbert Hoover. They not only shared an Iowa origin but a love of geology and fishing. After graduating, Hoover went to Australia as a gold miner for a British mining company. Beginning with that position, Hoover earned increasingly larger salaries, becoming a millionaire at a young age. It was from Australian that he sent Lou Henry a telegram asking her to marry him, an offer which she accepted.

Following her graduation, in the interim, Hoover accepted the offer of the young Chinese Emperor to be Director General of the Department of Mines of the Chinese Government. Later in the day, they took the train to San Francisco.

The following day, 11 February , they sailed for China. Lou Hoover led an extraordinarily active and public life before becoming First Lady, leading and working in many new movements and organizations, both in and outside of the United States. It might be safely stated that no previous First Lady had as wide and varied a professional life, a record perhaps matched only by her immediate successor Eleanor Roosevelt.

In the first weeks of her marriage, immediately following her arrival in China, Lou Hoover began an intensive study of her imminent life in the new country — the culture, the regional differences, and the history. Although based in Tientsin, she visited Peking and some interior regions.

Her interest in Chinese porcelains prompted a lifelong passion for collecting samples of various period porcelains, especially of the Ming and K'ang periods. She spoke the language more easily than her husband and often translated materials for him. One year into their residency in Tientsin, in June of , the Boxer Rebellion broke out. This was a famously violent attacks and murdering by native Chinese on foreigners in a portion of the port city where they predominantly resided; the natives resented the growing internal influences of non-Chinese on their society.

Throughout the crisis, Lou Hoover displayed a level-headed bravery, helping to build up protective barricades, caring for those who were wounded by gunshots, and even assuming management of a small local herd of cows to provide fresh dairy products to children.

Eventually troops from the U. She got around by bicycle, and learned to use a pistol as a means of self-protection. Despite her home being riddled with bullets and shells, she and her husband remained unharmed. Although she began to write a book on their experiences in China, it remained uncompleted and thus, unpublished.

She did, however, publish an article on the Dowager Empress of China In August of , the Hoovers moved to London, England, Lou's husband having gone to work for the international mining outfit, Bewick, Moreing and Company. He worked for them until , when he founded his own firm. Although she would move around the globe giving birth and raising her two sons in the process , following "Bert" on assignments in European nations, India, Egypt, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, Siberia, Ceylon, Burma, and Japan, London was their base until For five years during this period she began a collaborative writing project with her husband, the translation from Latin to English of a guide to mining and metallurgy, called De Re Metallica by the German mineralogist George Agricola.

After occupancy in a Hyde Park apartment, they bought an expansive house they called "Red House," and it became a central gathering place for many Americans and other foreigners based in London, thus widening the couples' circle into the arts, entertainment, sciences, politics, law, banking and business.

A love of theater was also borne in her during this time. During this time, she published her article, "John Milne, Seismologist" 19l2. When the conflict that would become World War I broke out in Europe in , Lou Hoover helped to create and chair the American Women's War Relief Fund and Hospital, an organization to help raise immediate funds and support for the suffering.

She also became a leader in the Society of American Women in London, helping to find housing, food, some financial aid and serving as an informational clearing-house to those unable to get home. With hundreds of thousands of Europeans displaced and, in the case of Belgians, whose country was occupied by Germany, widespread starvation, Hoover was asked by the American Ambassador to organize a mobilization of immediate aid from neutral countries, heading up the Commission for Relief in Belgium.

Bringing her own two sons back to California, Lou Hoover managed to work in partnership with him, as a special representative of the commission, organizing a special branch focused on her fellow Californians, raising money and facilitating transportation of the first boatload of food to those in need.

She further encouraged the widespread sale in America of Belgian lace as a wartime means of supporting one of that nation's primary industries during the war years.

Her article "Belgium's Needs" was also widely reprinted. Travelling between the U. King Albert I of Belgium would decorate her in appreciation for her substantive work, in She forever maintained an interest in the culture and people of Belgium.

In , when America entered the war, Hoover's work led to his appointment by President Woodrow Wilson as chief of the U. This brought the Hoovers to live in Washington. There, as volunteer head of the Administration's Women's Committee, Lou Hoover assumed her first major high-profile role in the United States, seeking to illustrate through example, speeches and widespread media publicity how Americans — mostly women who were the primary housekeepers and consumers — could practically conserve food that was needed for American forces and ongoing refugee relief efforts.

The encouraging of Americans to go one day a week without wheat, and another day a week without meat, and using as little sugar as possible, came to be known as "Hoovering," and Lou Hoover offered recipes that adhered to these guidelines and urged citizens to plant, grow, cultivate and harvest their own produce.

She even led lessons on how to do it all. Lou Hoover also took a direct role in finding housing and creating a social gathering center for the thousands of single women who poured into Washington to work in government for the war effort. It was Lou Hoover who prevailed upon Edith Wilson to accept the role of honorary president of a new organization that she helped forge — the Girl Scouts of America. Every succeeding First Lady since Mrs. Hoover has that role. Her exposure to Great Britain's Boy Scouts and Girl Guides was the impetus to her creation of a similar healthy youth movement for young women.

On 12 March , she formed an American Girl Guides group with eighteen girls; a year later she changed the name to Girl Scouts. Intending to not only provide them with exposure to and respect for the natural world, but also self-reliance, discipline and resourceful thinking, she also insisted that any young women be admitted, regardless of physical disability, socio-economic, racial, religious, regional or ethnic background. Just five years after creating the Girl Scouts, Low met Lou Hoover and, struck by the Californian's own grounding in a childhood spent camping, hiking and exploring the natural world, immediately recruited her into the organization's leadership.

Lou Hoover began her work with the organization as a National Commissioner One aspect of the movement that especially appealed to Lou Hoover was the potential for mobilizing thousands of healthy young women to respond to crises and disaster, an effort with which she had practical experience during World War I.

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Lou Henry was consciously raised by both parents in a manner unconventional for young girls in that era. Along with being socialized to assume traditionally feminine traits, both parents encouraged her love of physical exercise and sports. She played baseball in the street, basketball, and enjoyed archery, boating, sledding, roller-skating and ice-skating. Most especially, however, she enjoyed being her father's companion in the outdoors, hiking, fishing, and camping; her lifelong love of outdoor physical exertion was borne at this time.

Her father also introduced her to business issues. She was also to become an expert horsewoman, riding bareback and in the formal English style, including sidesaddle.

Despite her Midwestern roots, Lou Hoover considered herself a westerner. She took to the outdoors lifestyle of California, deepening her exploration and knowledge of the natural world. Her father continued to educate her on geological formations, plant-life, even the safety and edibility of nuts, ferns and other foods found in forests and canyons.

She also learned to hunt rabbit. She also began a lifelong interest in the native culture and history of California, including a nearly-professional study of architecture. As a young woman, she also showed an interest in larger public issues, as illustrated by two school essays she wrote at the age of It was during a brief period when she was working as a clerk in the bank now run by her father in Monterey, that her academic pursuit of geology was prompted following a Stanford University professor's lecture on the subject.

Although she was never employed as a miner or geologist, she had a professional perspective on the field as both a student and wife of a professional in the field; she later became a member of the Women's Auxiliary of the American Institute of Mining and Metallurgical Engineers.

She also had a faculty with linguistics. She learned Latin at Stanford and, when going to live in China, learned Mandarin Chinese by training with a tutor. During the White House years, she was known to communicate with the President in a few words of Chinese he did not speak it as fluently as she when they wished to keep their conversation private.

In time, she was to be fluent in five languages, including Spanish, Italian, and French. She also had a short stint as a substitute teacher in a public schoolhouse just next to the Monterey Mission. During her first year at Stanford, her professor, J. Branner introduced Lou Henry to his assistant, senior class member Herbert Hoover. They not only shared an Iowa origin but a love of geology and fishing.

After graduating, Hoover went to Australia as a gold miner for a British mining company. Beginning with that position, Hoover earned increasingly larger salaries, becoming a millionaire at a young age. It was from Australian that he sent Lou Henry a telegram asking her to marry him, an offer which she accepted.

Following her graduation, in the interim, Hoover accepted the offer of the young Chinese Emperor to be Director General of the Department of Mines of the Chinese Government. Later in the day, they took the train to San Francisco. The following day, 11 February , they sailed for China. Lou Hoover led an extraordinarily active and public life before becoming First Lady, leading and working in many new movements and organizations, both in and outside of the United States.

It might be safely stated that no previous First Lady had as wide and varied a professional life, a record perhaps matched only by her immediate successor Eleanor Roosevelt. In the first weeks of her marriage, immediately following her arrival in China, Lou Hoover began an intensive study of her imminent life in the new country — the culture, the regional differences, and the history. Although based in Tientsin, she visited Peking and some interior regions.

Her interest in Chinese porcelains prompted a lifelong passion for collecting samples of various period porcelains, especially of the Ming and K'ang periods. She spoke the language more easily than her husband and often translated materials for him. One year into their residency in Tientsin, in June of , the Boxer Rebellion broke out. This was a famously violent attacks and murdering by native Chinese on foreigners in a portion of the port city where they predominantly resided; the natives resented the growing internal influences of non-Chinese on their society.

Throughout the crisis, Lou Hoover displayed a level-headed bravery, helping to build up protective barricades, caring for those who were wounded by gunshots, and even assuming management of a small local herd of cows to provide fresh dairy products to children.

Eventually troops from the U. She got around by bicycle, and learned to use a pistol as a means of self-protection. Despite her home being riddled with bullets and shells, she and her husband remained unharmed. Although she began to write a book on their experiences in China, it remained uncompleted and thus, unpublished.

She did, however, publish an article on the Dowager Empress of China In August of , the Hoovers moved to London, England, Lou's husband having gone to work for the international mining outfit, Bewick, Moreing and Company.

He worked for them until , when he founded his own firm. Although she would move around the globe giving birth and raising her two sons in the process , following "Bert" on assignments in European nations, India, Egypt, Australia, New Zealand, Russia, Siberia, Ceylon, Burma, and Japan, London was their base until For five years during this period she began a collaborative writing project with her husband, the translation from Latin to English of a guide to mining and metallurgy, called De Re Metallica by the German mineralogist George Agricola.

After occupancy in a Hyde Park apartment, they bought an expansive house they called "Red House," and it became a central gathering place for many Americans and other foreigners based in London, thus widening the couples' circle into the arts, entertainment, sciences, politics, law, banking and business.

A love of theater was also borne in her during this time. During this time, she published her article, "John Milne, Seismologist" 19l2. When the conflict that would become World War I broke out in Europe in , Lou Hoover helped to create and chair the American Women's War Relief Fund and Hospital, an organization to help raise immediate funds and support for the suffering.

She also became a leader in the Society of American Women in London, helping to find housing, food, some financial aid and serving as an informational clearing-house to those unable to get home. With hundreds of thousands of Europeans displaced and, in the case of Belgians, whose country was occupied by Germany, widespread starvation, Hoover was asked by the American Ambassador to organize a mobilization of immediate aid from neutral countries, heading up the Commission for Relief in Belgium.

Bringing her own two sons back to California, Lou Hoover managed to work in partnership with him, as a special representative of the commission, organizing a special branch focused on her fellow Californians, raising money and facilitating transportation of the first boatload of food to those in need.

She further encouraged the widespread sale in America of Belgian lace as a wartime means of supporting one of that nation's primary industries during the war years. Her article "Belgium's Needs" was also widely reprinted. Travelling between the U. King Albert I of Belgium would decorate her in appreciation for her substantive work, in She forever maintained an interest in the culture and people of Belgium.

In , when America entered the war, Hoover's work led to his appointment by President Woodrow Wilson as chief of the U. This brought the Hoovers to live in Washington. There, as volunteer head of the Administration's Women's Committee, Lou Hoover assumed her first major high-profile role in the United States, seeking to illustrate through example, speeches and widespread media publicity how Americans — mostly women who were the primary housekeepers and consumers — could practically conserve food that was needed for American forces and ongoing refugee relief efforts.

The encouraging of Americans to go one day a week without wheat, and another day a week without meat, and using as little sugar as possible, came to be known as "Hoovering," and Lou Hoover offered recipes that adhered to these guidelines and urged citizens to plant, grow, cultivate and harvest their own produce.

She even led lessons on how to do it all. Lou Hoover also took a direct role in finding housing and creating a social gathering center for the thousands of single women who poured into Washington to work in government for the war effort. It was Lou Hoover who prevailed upon Edith Wilson to accept the role of honorary president of a new organization that she helped forge — the Girl Scouts of America.

Every succeeding First Lady since Mrs. Hoover has that role. Her exposure to Great Britain's Boy Scouts and Girl Guides was the impetus to her creation of a similar healthy youth movement for young women.

On 12 March , she formed an American Girl Guides group with eighteen girls; a year later she changed the name to Girl Scouts. Intending to not only provide them with exposure to and respect for the natural world, but also self-reliance, discipline and resourceful thinking, she also insisted that any young women be admitted, regardless of physical disability, socio-economic, racial, religious, regional or ethnic background. Just five years after creating the Girl Scouts, Low met Lou Hoover and, struck by the Californian's own grounding in a childhood spent camping, hiking and exploring the natural world, immediately recruited her into the organization's leadership.

Lou Hoover began her work with the organization as a National Commissioner One aspect of the movement that especially appealed to Lou Hoover was the potential for mobilizing thousands of healthy young women to respond to crises and disaster, an effort with which she had practical experience during World War I.

One such effort she found viable was teaching the growing membership how to prepare, cultivate, harvest and re-soil vegetable war gardens. She was not above taking a hoe and illustrating the process herself.

Further, she saw a strong connection between mental and emotional clarity and spending time in physical exertion in the natural, outdoor setting. At its most basic level, she believed the benefit to the mind and the body from scouting activities would manifest in the lives of maturing girls in both traditional roles as homemaker, wife and mother, but also in the community as activists and participants in civic-related projects.

Despite her status and the spousal obligations that continued for her as a Cabinet wife, Lou Hoover played a substantive and important role at the national level in the founding years of the Girl Scouts.

During the Harding and Coolidge Administrations, Lou Hoover was first Vice President , then promoted to President of the organization , then returned to being Vice President She even assisted her sister Jean Large, a professional writer, in drafting Nancy Goes Scouting, a book for young adults in the late 's. While working for the national organization, Lou Hoover also simultaneously founded troops in the two cities she then called home, Washington, D.

In creating Troop VII and then becoming its Troop Leader in Washington, Lou Hoover included both white and African-American girls, an extremely rare integration for young children of that generation; she had two stints in this role and With her dual residency in California, she did likewise in Palo Alto, helping to found the troop there in Expanding from it, she helped create the Santa Clara Council in , thereby opening the movement to the western states.

She served as a member of the Palo Alto Council for two separate periods Lou Hoover put into practice one of her primary contributions to the organization; organizing and training its adult troop leaders. To this end, she proposed building one of the "little houses" that could be utilized for both leadership and the girl membership as a headquarters. She and two fellow board members of the Palo Alto branch contributed five hundred dollars each to build it, and the city donated a portion of land for its site.

Local craftsman and laborers donated their skills to help build the structure. After four years from concept to completion, Lou Hoover dedicated the site in June of Despite her involvement in the management and business aspects of the Girl Scouts, Lou Hoover never lost her love of leading hikes, pointing out rock formations and wildlife, the practicalities of sleeping under the stars and even building fires and roasting food over it.

Throughout her career in the organization, she would visit Girl Scout camps all through the United States and participated in numerous ceremonies honoring troops. Anticipating that, the couple first commissioned architect Louis Mulgardt to begin designs but when he announced it to the press in the midst of wartime deprivation, they fired him.

The couple then had Stanford University art professor Arthur B. Clark, an amateur architect, begin the project but on the condition that it was Lou Hoover's design. Her intent was clear and executed with exacting professionalism. While not a trained architect, she admitted, "I have often wished that I had time to make a profession of it. She did not want a home that could be described or identified by any known architectural style, but rather which fused the many divergent types she had seen around the world, from the square homes of Algeria to those of Native American adobes.

Radically modernistic in its overall look, it remains a true reflection of Mrs. Hoover's embrace of many different world cultures, and was dubbed "International" in its look. Fireproofed, rambling, with hidden terraces and outdoor living rooms, its main entrance high on a hill gave it a look of a smaller house than it was; much of its expanse was hidden on the back side, three stories reaching down a long slop.

Lou Hoover drew sketches for her vision and oversaw construction. Finished in June of , the Hoovers lived here for brief periods of time through the Twenties and early Thirties, and for a longer stretch after leaving the White House in , though eventually taking a New York apartment in The remarkably designed house was donated to the university where it serves as the president's private home.

Although several First Ladies, from Lucretia Garfield to Jackie Kennedy took a direct role in determining the look of homes they had built for themselves, the Hoover home is the only example of architecture largely designed by a First Lady. Traveling frequently across the continental United States was a delight Lou Hoover indulged in many times. In , for example, she drover her own car from northern California to Washington, D.

She also made her first visit to the territory of Alaska in July of , joining her husband as part of President Warren Harding's presidential junket there by ship. Her relationship with First Lady Florence Harding was cordial, if formal, though both shared the conviction that young women should be given equal opportunities in their professional, civic and athletic lives.

With the Hardings in San Francisco at the time of the President's sudden death, she interacted with the press as a buffer for Florence Harding.

Disliking the time-consuming and old-fashioned custom of having to leave calling cards on formal social visits to other spouses of political figures in Washington, Lou Hoover prevailed upon her fellow Cabinet wives to agree to end the custom, thereby single-handedly ending a 19th century custom that was a burden to more civically active women of the early 20th century like herself.

At complete ease in delivering public speeches to large audiences, through the Twenties, Lou Hoover's membership and involvement in numerous women's clubs and associations had her speaking across the country on various topics. In the fall of , she spoke to the Pan-American International Women's Committee, suggesting that an understanding of women leaders from different countries could be a component in furthering better international relations.

Along these lines, she declared in a speech to the League of Women Voters that women were "here to stay" in the political process. Her fair-mindedness, as well as her extraordinary degree of public service landed her on the cover of Time magazine, the first time any future First Lady was so honored. A month later, in St. That autumn, she was host to women of some thirty-nine nations, representatives to the International Council of Women's Peace Conference.

In May of , in a speech to the Daughters of the American Revolution, she voiced her support for the freer, albeit more revealing, clothing of young women of the era, considering the style to be "sensible. Claus" at the Washington's Children Hospital. Besides her work with the Girl Scouts, and among her dozens of commitments to public service organizations, Lou Hoover was also a key figure in the era's movement to widen opportunity for women in athletic activities. Threat mentioned Kavanaugh vote.

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More flooding likely in Texas as record rains continue to fall The Northeast will experience the coldest weather this season. Isaac and Rebecca Johnson Stearns are not listed as constitutional members of the Sandy Creek Baptist Church, but must have moved to the area later.

They had one child, a daughter, Hepzibah, who was born in , in Tolland. Historians tell us that the Reverend Shubal Stearns was caring for his brother, who had both physical and mental problems. In general, it may be said that while the Baptist from parts of North Carolina to the north of Sandy Creek went to Tennessee, those from Little River and the southeastern parts of the Province went rather to South Carolina, when they despaired of being protected in their rights by the Government of North Carolina.

In , the Sandy Creek Baptist Church split, between members supporting the missionary movement, and members who were non-missionary.

Members supporting the missionary movement left and established a church near a school known as Shady Grove. Today the two churches, Primitive Baptist and Missionary Baptist, stand alongside the site of the original church and share ownership and maintenance of the grave of Shubal Stearns. Two of Shubal Stearns disciples: She was born in , in Virginia. The Tax List showed that he owned acres in Columbia and Washington counties of Georgia.

She was once jailed in Virginia, for refusing to stop preaching the Gospel, although she was three months pregnant at the time. Her preaching was powerful enough to convince a man named Cartledge to become a preacher. She also converted her arresting constable and magistrate.

Martha also assisted her husband, Daniel, in his churches and preached to his congregations. Marshall had a rare felicity of finding in this lady, a Priscilla, a helper in the Gospel. In fact, it should not be concealed that his extraordinary success in the ministry, is ascribable in no small degree to Mrs. Marshall, being a lady of good sense, singular piety, and surprising elocution, has, in countless instances melted a whole concourse into tears by her prayers and exhortations!

Martha Stearns Marshall, great numbers turned to the Lord. Samuel Harris, with whom he immediately afterwards made several tours, preached and planted the gospel in several places, as far as James-river. Marshall is credited with helping lay the foundation that produced the phenomenal growth of the Virginia Baptists.

In the course of their marriage, Martha Stearns Marshall gave birth to ten children, eight sons and two daughters. He purchased sixty-seven acres in , and four and one-half acres in , in Tolland.

Sarah, his mother, stayed with her son, Jonathan, until she died on May 3, In , he and his wife moved with the Reverend Shubal Stearns, his brother-in-law, to Virginia. He purchased one hundred fifty acres of land and two hundred forty-four acres on North River in Hampton County, Virginia which then included what is now all of Mineral and the western part of Morgan counties, West Virginia.

Jonathan died while living in what later became Union District, S. His mother moved there with her son, where she lived close to her sister, Martha Stearns Marshall. Thomas Brandon, after the fall of Charleston. Micajah obtained land in , which adjoined land previously owned by Rev.

His mother, Rebecca, died in Richmond County, Georgia, in Micajah was not the Primitive Baptist preacher. He first married Hannah Stimson, daughter of Dr. She was his first cousin. James Stimson, was the first physician in Tolland, Connecticut. Hannah died in , while residing in the fort.

He and his first wife had four sons and two daughters. When Mulkey and his members moved to what became Union District, South Carolina, Peter, and his children did not join them. Margaret was born circa Her first husband was killed while transporting prisoners for the Sheriff of Orange County, North Carolina. He was stabbed by a prisoner and died in In , Jacob Gibson gave land to build a meeting house, and the Little River Baptist Church, in what later became Fairfield District, South Carolina, was constituted February 26, , from members remaining from the church that the Reverend Philip Mulkey had moved to what became Union District, S.

Peter Stearns, his second wife, Margaret, and their family were members of this church. Peter served seven hundred six days as a Patriot soldier in the militia from March 3, , to October 4, , under Capt. Anderson Thomas during the American Revolutionary War. Levi fought under Col. Peter Stearns died in , in Fairfield District, S. His second wife, Margaret, died after He married Anna Field, daughter of John and Anna? Field, on August 26, , in Tolland, Connecticut. Anna was born circa , in Tolland.

They joined Orange County friends, brothers: Aaron and Joseph Pinson, and their families. The Pinsons had moved to this area of South Carolina in They were early converts of the Reverend Shubal Stearns. Aaron had four tracts of land surveyed for him in late Aaron Pinson received a grant of acres of land on the Saluda River in May of He may have received a license to preach by the Reverend Shubal Stearns before moving to what later became Laurens District, S.

He was ordained to the Gospel Ministry shortly after the Raeburn Creek Baptist Church was constituted in September of , and became pastor of the church. By the late summer of , the Reverend Aaron Pinson with his family and various other members of several South Carolina churches settled in the Watauga colonies of present day North East Tennessee. They prepared to protect their community from attacks as the revolution began. The sons and sons-in-law of the Rev. Aaron Pinson served the cause by bearing arms or giving material aid or both.

He moved to Wilkes County, N. Aaron Pinson died between and , in Laurens District, S. Their daughter married Thomas Shirley. He was a Patriot soldier, serving, while a resident of North Carolina. Some sources state that her name was Ruth. She was his second wife. A record of her name was not been preserved.

Nancy was given the title of Beloved Woman. This title was one given the principal woman in the female councils and endowed her with power to speak in the council of the Chiefs. Without that victory the story of America could have been different.

It probably disappeared in the next few years. They had three sons and five daughters. Eneas Stimson, son of Dr. She was born August 30, , in Tolland, Connecticut. He and his wife were related. They were constitutional members of the Sandy Creek Baptist Church in Eneas and Elizabeth moved to what became Laurens District, S. Eneas indicated in his will that they had adopted a girl named, Mary.

It was constituted in , and a Meeting House thirty by twenty-six feet was erected about ten miles from Augusta, Georgia. It was on one of these tours that he was arrested for illegally conducting a religious service.

When he appeared before the magistrate, Col. Barnard, he forbade him to reenter Georgia to hold religious services.

An interesting result of this encounter was that Samuel Cartledge, the man who arrested Marshall was later converted and became a faithful Baptist pastor for over fifty years, and the magistrate, Col. Barnard, became a zealous and effective Christian. On January 1, , Marshall choosing to obey God rather than man, moved his family into Georgia. This colony settled in Georgia on Kiokee Creek, St. He was the only pastor to remain in Georgia during the American Revolutionary War.

This scene continued, until his wife could bear the suspense no longer, and undertook herself to make the disclosure. During the last thirteen years of his life he was able to organize several churches and at least fourteen ministers were either called or influenced by his ministry.

Just before his death he acted as moderator of the Georgia Baptist Association, founded in , at Kiokee Church. This night I shall, probably expire. But I have nothing to fear. I have fought a good fight, I have finished my course, I have kept the faith. And henceforth there is laid up for me a crown of righteousness. God has shown me that he is my God, that I am His son, and that an eternal weight of glory is mine!

Hold out to the end. Eternal glory is before us. I have been praying that I may go home tonight. I had great happiness in our worship this morning, particularly in singing, which will make a part of my exercises in a blessed eternity. A suitable discourse to his memory was delivered from II Timothy 4: His wife, Martha, died in , and was buried beside her husband, but her grave was not marked. Daniel Marshall was succeeded as pastor of Kiokee Baptist Church by his son, Abraham Marshall , and Abraham was succeeded by his son, Jabez Marshall These men served as pastors of Kiokee for a period of sixty years of its history.

He was ordained by the Kiokee Baptist Church in Abraham preached to thousands on his New England tours in and In nothing, perhaps was he more remarkable than the power of description. He would portray the glories of heaven with such matchless force and breadth, that his hearers could scarcely remain upon their seats; and he would depict the miseries of the lost in such terrible, burning language, as almost to make the hair stand erect upon your head. He was affectionately called the Friend of Black People.

He was a trustee of Franklin College now the University of Georgia. He was also moderator of the Georgia Baptist Association for 19 years. He was the son of David Mulkey and an unknown wife. David was born circa , and died before His grandfather was Philip Mulkey Sr. He had a brother named Jonathan Mulkey.

Sarah was first married to? He was born circa They married circa , and had a son, George Lewis, born circa Philip died in , in Edgecomb Precinct, North Carolina. He was born circa , probably in Bertie Precinct, North Carolina. His first wife was Mary Couch. Sarah died in Orange County, N.

John Patterson also died in Orange County, N. Philip Mulkey, son of David, was first a member of the Episcopal Church. She was born circa , possibly in Mecklenburg County, Virginia. Philip and Ann had six children, four sons and two daughters. Their last child, Robert, was born in what later became Union District, S.

However, I mounted my horse and went homewards. My fears had so disordered my understanding that I fancied the first tree I came to bowed its head to strike at me, which made me start from it. Happening to look up, I fancied that the stars cast a frowning and malignant aspect upon me. When I came home, I went to bed and endeavored to conceal the matter from my wife; but it could not be; for thenceforth I could neither eat, nor sleep nor rest for some days; but continued to roar out, I am damned!

I shall soon be in hell! Her attempts to comfort me were vain; and my emaciated body and ghastly visage terrified her. It is hardly credible that such a thought should relieve; but so it was, that I found myself much easier when I perceived that God had any use for me, or that I should be any way profitable to him and the he made me for his glory. I strove to please him by reformation and obedience for some space of love came in with the forced mentioned thought , but yet was I a wretched man.

As I was reading these words If ye have not been faithful in that which is another mans who will give you that which is your own? Upon this I resolved to serve the devil faithfully. Mean while a benighted stranger Rev. John Newton came to my house who read a chapter 33 rd of Isaiah and prayed; and thereby turned by thoughts to Christ, and Salvation by him, for the time. The novelty of this matter and the possibility it introduced, that my sins had been laid on Christ and that God had stricken and smitten Christ for them so that he could spare me without falsifying his threatenings or violate his justice affected me in such a manner as exceeds description.

I found an inclination to adore the stranger, and to question whether he was an angel or man? But made no discovery there of nor of my thoughts to him. The next day he departed, and as he was going this thought came in my mind, There is Lot going out of Sodom as soon as he disappears fire will come down and burn me and mine!

I ran after him, and kept my eye upon him; but the wood presently intercepted the sight; upon which I threw my self with my face to the ground expecting fire and brimstone. I continued in this posture for some time almost dead with terror. Finding the fire did not come immediately I began to hope that it would not come at all; and thereupon prayed that God would spare me.

I received comfort; and was running to tell my wife of it; but before I reached the house I lost all comfort and my distress came on again. In my agony I said many a time, O that John Newton had said! O that I was as good as John Newton!

Upon which this text crowded into my head, The Spirit of Elijah doth rest on Elisha. I could not discern how this text concerned me; or why it bore so on my mind? I persuade myself this was the signification; and, blessed be God, my hope was not disappointed: My wife saw a surprising change in my countenance. I told the whole matter; and began to preach up conversion to her. She understood me not, though I persuaded myself I was able to make everyone sensible what the newbirth means.

I took my Bible and hastened to my neighbor Campbell; when I came in I opened it at the third ch. My neighbor swore at me most desperately, adding, What devilish project are you now upon with the Word of God in your hand? Upon which he stripped, and sprang out of doors, challenging me to fight! I sat down in the house and began to weep. He sprang in and skipping and bounding about the floor spitting on his hands and clenching his fists dared me to fight.

I replied, You know, my dear neighbor, that I am able to beat you; but now you may beat me if you will; I shall not hinder you! Hearing this and seeing me all in tears made him look as a man astonished! He put on his shirt, and sat by me, and we both wept. But my talk of the new birth was not understood by him any more than by my wife. Soon after I made myself known to Shubal Stearns and church, and was surprised to find that they understood the new birth, and had knowledge of the tribulations attending it which I had fancied were peculiar to my own cast, etc.

They soon increased to over one hundred members. Alice was born in Prince Edward County in Benjamin had land in Bute County, N. His land was bounded by lands of Ralph Jackson Sr. Benjamin Holcombe gave the church under the leadership of the Reverend Philip Mulkey two acres of land for a meeting house. They all served under Col. Benjamin and Alice had seven children, five sons and two daughters. He made his will on August 13, , which was probated October 17, He died in Union District, S.

It was this Sequoyah who invented the Cherokee alphabet and enabled the Cherokee to write in their language. She was born in Lunenburg in Their first two children, Joseph and Mary, were born in Lunenburg County. Joseph Gist was born August 27, His family moved first to Orange County, N. He moved with his wife, Hannah, his daughter, Sarah, and his son, William, and his father and mother, to Washington County, North Carolina Tennessee , in Joseph and Hannah moved with his parents to Barren County, Kentucky, in She died in Barren County on May 14, They had two sons and five daughters.

She was the daugher of Zachariah and Mary Bullington Belew. He received several wounds. John died in , in Barren County, Kentucky. She and Joseph had two sons and a daughter. Here he petitioned to build a gristmill, was appointed a road overseer and a constable.

The Reverend Philip Mulkey was pastor at this time. The church was located about ten miles upstream from the Deep-Haw confluence near present-day Lockville, N. She moved with her parents to Orange County, N. Mary married James Stevenson in , several months after their move to Washington County. He was born December 10, , in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. They had seven daughters and four sons. The writer was unable to obtain names of James parents. John Gist was born in North Carolina on November 23, He moved with his parents to Craven County, S.

He was a Patriot soldier in the American Revolution War, serving in the counties of Washington and Sullivan in what later became Tennessee. He was a magistrate with his father, Benjamin, in Greene County, Tennessee, and when the county was organized under the state of Franklin, served as a Justice of the Peace.

He married Hannah Geron, daughter of Hiram and Susannah? Geron, in , in Knox County, Tennessee. They moved with his parents to Barren County, Kentucky, circa They had five sons and one daughter.

On March 5, , he and his wife, received a grant of acres of land in Craven County later Union District at the mouth of Sugar Creek. He was a deacon in the Fairforest Baptist Church. William Breed Gist Sr. She was born in , in Greene County, Tennessee.

She and William had at least two sons and two daughters. They lived in Barren County, Kentucky, for several years. He was a member of the Mill Creek Baptist Church. They had seven sons and three daughters. His wife, Elizabeth, died in White County, after , and he died there March 22, He was born on January 30, , in Augusta County, Virginia. They moved to White County, Tennessee, where most of their children were born. They had four sons and two daughters. She died in White County on August 4, , and her husband died there August 20, She married James McClain.

He was born in , in Greene County, Tennessee. They had one son and two daughters. She died in Hardin County, Tennessee, before James next married Kizziah Hardin, daughter of James W.

They had a son named William. He moved with his parents to Washington County, Tennessee, in She died April 24, , in Knox County, Tennessee. Hinds, in Knox County, Tennessee, in He moved his family with the family of his father, Benjamin Gist Sr.

He witnessed a deed made by his father, Benjamin Sr. At this time, he and his father had already moved their families to Jackson County, Tennessee. He served in the War of He and his second wife, Rhoda, had four sons and four daughters and another adopted son. On June 16, , Benjamin Gist, Jr. It was sixty miles from Barren County, to Jackson County. Sevier John to head off an Indian uprising and thus give time for the expedition to get home.

They moved to Smith County, Tennessee, in the fall of In May of , Benjamin Sr. They moved to Jackson County, Tennessee, in , or before. He married Mary Powell circa , in N.

She was born circa , in N. Names of her parents may have been John and Alice Murrell Powell. His will was dated December 24, , and was recorded in Union District, S. His wife, Mary, died circa , in Union District, S. They had four sons and three daughters.

He was only eight years old when his father and mother died in She was born in New London, Connecticut, on October 14, The original church moved with Mulkey to what later became Union District, S. Obediah received a land grant of acres on the branches of Fairforest and Sugar Creeks on February 17, Obediah Howard moved with the only remaining ordained minister capable of administering the affairs of the church, the Reverend Alexander McDougal, and the Patriot membership of the church moved to a part of the McDougal land, where the church established by the Rev.

Philip Mulkey was continued. Obediah Howard was a Patriot soldier and served before and after the fall of Charleston as a private in the local militia in Col. John McCool was the commander of his company. His son, Joseph, was also a Patriot soldier and fought under Col.

Thomas Brandon after the fall of Charleston. I, Deed Books A-F, page Joseph Howard took his own life in Union District, S. This relationship is not fully established. Jean was born circa He and the Reverend Alexander McDougal attended the meeting. He was also elected a deacon of this church.

After the census of Union District, S. This area later became a part of Tennessee. Nancy and her husband had three sons who were preachers, John, Philip and Isaac, and a grandson, John Newton Mulkey, who was also a minister.

They had a son, John Gibbs, a well-known pastor in Union District. The two Hart wives were sisters and daughters of Aaron Hart, who served as a Patriot soldier under Col.

Thomas Brandon in the American Revolutionary War. Others traveling with this group were: They had seven sons and seven daughters. A man named Jiles Thompson and his agents were to build the meetinghouse. Obediah and Priscilla Howard were deceased when their grandson, the Reverend John Mulkey, began to subscribe to the reform theology of the Christian Church. Their log structure was eventually encased by weather boarding and then bricked as the congregation continued into modern times.

Mill Creek Baptist Church still meets in this building today. She was born April 29, , in Groton. He and his wife lived near her parents in Groton until after August 11, , as evident by deeds executed during this time. The Perry-Poole Family Tree.

After assisting Daniel Marshall in a ministry to the Mohawks , he and his family moved with the Marshalls to Frederick County, Virginia, in After Shubal Stearns and his family arrived, they joined together and moved to Cacapon in Hampshire County, where they established a church.

He was fifty-one years old at this time. Their son, Joseph, was born in Groton, Connecticut, on April 8, He and his wife sold this land to his brother, Avery Breed, on May 27, They had four sons and four daughters. Richard George was a son of James and Judith? Avery purchased this land in February of , from Bryan White. There is no record of his marriage. He traveled with his sister, Priscilla Breed Howard and her husband, Obediah, to Barren County, Kentucky, and died shortly after they arrived.

His brother, Nathan, was administrator of his will. He was a twin brother of Priscilla. Her parents were Quakers. Thomas Brandon with his brother, Joseph. Two sons and five daughters were born to their union. Both died in Barren County. No further information exists on this couple. They both died in Barren County, Kentucky. The writer was unable to obtain additional information on this couple. Their daughter, Sarah Breed, was born in Groton, Connecticut, in He was born circa , in Chatham County, North Carolina.

They had five sons and five daughters. Samuel Harlan died in Union District, S. He and his wife, Hannah, moved to Washington County, Tennessee, with his father and mother in John Sevier at the Battle of Kings Mountain.

Both were both buried in the Old Mulkey Church Cemetery. They had five daughters and three sons. He was born in , in Union District. Jesse and Ruth were also born in Union District. Before , they had moved to Barren County, Kentucky. Their last three children: John Springer died in Barren County in She died in Barren County in He was born circa , in Chatham County, N. They had five daughters and one son. Priscilla Avery Breed, his wife, received payment after the American Revolutionary War for beef she gave to the Rebels in Thomas Thompson was born in , in Ireland.

Name of his wife has not been preserved. She was probably deceased before he moved to South Carolina. He had moved to this county with his son, Charles, in Charles was not married when they first moved to Craven County. We do not have an exact date of the demise of Thomas Thompson, but know that he left his acres near the Blackstock Ford to his son, Charles.

Thompson had four sons and one daughter. At sometime he was in the militia under Col. Elizabeth was still living when her husband died, but her death date has not been recorded. His son, Seaborn born , was already deceased when his father died. Susannah born , William born , John born and Charles born June 10, were all mentioned in his will. He sold this land to Tilman Bobo on June 10, She was born in , in Union District, S.

They had nine sons and four daughters. Rachel Collins was born between and She married Adam Moses Collins The author is not positive that this is his right name. He was born in the s. Apparently, Adam, was not a member of this church. They were in what later became Fairfield District, S. He was born in , in Tolland, Connecticut. She died in Chambers County in November of He was granted a parcel of land near Tompkinsville that later became known as the old Jordan White farm.

He was a church leader and was ordained to the office of deacon on May 3,

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