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In fought in the Spanish Civil War, one of two Americans chosen to lead guerrilla warfare behind Franco's lines. Later studied poetry at Columbia University. Became friends with W. Several of his pieces of writing published in the New Masses. Toward the end of his life he was poet James Schuyler's lover, and features in the latter's poem "Dining Out with Doug and Frank" as "A dark Finn who looked not unlike a butch version of Valentino.

Hung around Greenwich Village early s and was friend of painter Iris Brody. Travelled to Mexico Cuernavaca and back, Was the "junkey girl" with whom Kerouac had brief affair in New York, as mentioned in his letter to Ginsberg, dated early May in Jack Kerouac: Mary had a daughter, Marcie, with Art, and later another daughter, Marlena.

She kicked her drug habit late s and married painter Kurt Witt, with whom she lived in New Hampshire. They settled in Brooklyn, New York, where Peter worked in a shoe factory. Married Columbia law student Henry Keeler in January , but this was annulled in August , and the following year Joan married Paul Adams, another Columbia law student.

In became common-law wife of William Burroughs who accidentally shot her in the head in Mexico City, September Later lived in Rochester, NY. At Columbia he was president of the Philolexian Society. In he transferred to Harvard University for graduate study in Far Eastern languages. Football colleague of Kerouac's at Horace Mann School, Went on to Columbia University.

Studied psychology, literature and philosophy at the University of South Florida. Became Kerouac's "southern pool partner," travelling companion and good friend around Florida in the later s.

Author of Free Beer: Studied Classics at Harvard and attended W. Auden's lectures on Shakespeare at the New School, , becoming his secretary the following year. Author of novel fragment The Vigilantes , and many poetic works, collected in Contact High Apostolos, born in Lowell. Later ran an insurance agency in Lowell. Gus BD , G. Apostolos, born in Greece. Purchaser of Kerouac's boyhood newspapers in Lowell. Lighting director for the March Berkeley poetry reading where Ginsberg first read the entire version of Howl.

Football colleague of Kerouac's at Horace Mann School, , and assistant baseball manager. Went on to Rutgers University. Educated at Oxford, and became leading figure in left-wing literary movement of s. Leading English poet, essayist and dramatist. Moved to USA in Met Kerouac and friends through his secretary, Alan Ansen, in s.

Auden BD , O. Went on to study at Yale University, and the Sorbonne in Paris. Later became famous film editor and director, credited with inventing the freeze frame and jump cut, as employed in "Girl of the Night" His work as director also included "11 Harrowhouse" , and "End of the Road" , which he scripted from John Barth's novel. English philosopher, noted for his work on logical positivism, his book Language, Truth and Logic being the first exposition of the subject in the English language.

During a stay in New York in late he met W. Auden and mixed with his circle of friends there. Kerouac's journal shows that he was present at a party with Ayer and others at John Clellon Holmes' apartment, November A girlfriend of Kerouac's who wrote about her as "Dark Eyes" in his journals , she married his friend Hal Chase in Accompanied Chase to Mexico in , where he studied at Mexico City College, but they separated shortly afterwards.

Virginia returned to New York and worked as a guitar-playing folksinger in Greenwich Village as Ginny Mayhew, using her mother's maiden name. Studied the Japanese martial art Aikido in and became the director of the New York Aikikai , although often taking side jobs as a belly dancer at a Greek night club to help pay the rent. Classmate of Kerouac's at Horace Mann School, Radio ham and tennis devotee.

Later studied at M. Football colleague of Kerouac's at Horace Mann School, , he also excelled in athletics, baseball and basketball. Later worked as a printer. Married Kerouac's girfriend Lois Sorrells in Malcolm participated in debating, dramatics and chess, and went on to Harvard. Richard was a member of the Debating and Dramatic Clubs, and later studied at M.

Bertrand, boyhood friend of Kerouac's in Lowell. One time rollercoaster worker, and bouncer at the Laurier Club, Lowell. Married Wilfred Bertrand in and worked in shoe factory. Died in Coos, Oregon. Enlisted in Women's Army Corps, Lived in Rocky Mount, North Carolina, and Orlando, Florida with her second husband and son, where Jack and his mother frequently visited.

Separated from her husband Paul in , and a few months later died of a heart attack. Moved to Orlando, Florida in Separated from Caroline in and, in , married a woman he had met in southern California. Grew up in North Carolina and Florida. Drafted into the Air Force, early s, then transferred to the army and served in Vietnam.

After his discharge he lived and worked in Alaska, fathered a child, and developed a drinking problem. Eventually, broke and homeless, he drifted to California. Edward is seen in the photograph with his new bride Evangeline, Marine Corps , rising to the rank of corporal and leaving the service in Later settled in the Los Angeles, California area. Went on to Yale University. Previously at Valley Forge Military Academy. Horseback rider and polo player.

Later studied at Yale. A lyrical poet, her first book of poetry, Body of This Death , was published in , followed by Dark Summer in , by which time she was poetry critic for The New Yorker.

Born in Queens, New York, the son of a dentist. Moved to Tangier, Morocco in , meeting Burroughs, Ginsberg and others there in the s. Also famous as a composer, writing music for productions by William Saroyan, Tennessee Williams, and others. Worked as a short-order cook at the West End Bar, where Kerouac first met him, and introduced him to William Burroughs, fall Fled with Ray and baby Rachel to Mexico in in order to avoid another conviction of her husband for robbery.

Her book about their Mexican adventures was completed in Mexican Memoirs aka For Love of Ray Adolescence in Manhattan before joining U. Spent six years in Bordentown Reformatory for armed robbery, during which time he studied literature and corresponded with Ginsberg and Corso, as well as Ezra Pound and Robert Graves.

During this time his volume of jazz-influenced poetry, Poems of Madness was published to much acclaim. He was of English ancestry, and his family had been in North America since the early colonial period. Died near Kansas City, Missouri. Brierly was impressed by Neal's high IQ of and arranged for him to be admitted into high-school in Denver. Neal remained friends with Brierly over the years, and introduced him to Kerouac and Ginsberg.

He returned to Denver to practice law and played a major role in establishing the Central City, Colorado opera festival, for which he was executive manager from to During World War II, Brierly went to England at the invitation of Winston Churchill as a consultant on the evacuation of children from urban to rural areas.

His work was developed into a movie, "Britain's Youth at War. Mannerly VC , Manley G. Her paintings were collected by William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg. Died of a drug overdose. Lived in same building 48 Morton St.

His first book, Who Walk In Darkness was claimed by many to have been the first Beat novel, and associated him with the Beat writers, despite his protestations.

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Please try again later. The team altogether played as touring side for fourteen months. Opening with a series of matches in Australia, they went through the season in England, then followed with a trip to America, while a second series of games in Australia concluded the enterprise before the side disbanded.

The huge programme of seventy-seven engagements was gone through by practically eleven men, for Midwinter, who they hoped would assist them regularly in England, had signed an agreement with Gloucestershire, and, after appearing for the Australians on a few occasions, was carried off from Lord's to the Oval by W.

Bush, and he did not take the field again as a member of the touring side. For that combination in England Garrett claimed 38 wickets for 10 runs apiece in eleven-a-side games--twenty of the fixtures were against odds. His record during the fourteen months in all matches showed wickets for 5 runs each. Four years laterwhen contests with 18's and 22's no longer figured on the programme arranged for the Australians, Garrett took wickets for under 14 runs apiece, and in his record was wickets for something over 18 runs each.

Possessed of a nice easy action, he made good use of his height--nearly six feet--and so came fast off the pitch. He bowled above medium-pace and under favourable conditions could turn the ball either way, while he sent down a very telling yorker, but got most of his wickets with the ball which pitched just outside the off-stump and went away slightly. On hard ground many good judges regarded him as more effective than Spofforth or Boyle. In the tour he took ten Middlesex wickets at Lord's for 82 runs, and at Prince's he disposed of seven Players of England for 41 runs.

Four years later among his best performances were seven Surrey wickets for 31 runs and twelve Kent wickets for , while in four matches which the Australians played with Yorkshire 27 wickets fell to him for 9 runs apiece. In his successes included seven wickets for 40 against Lord Sheffield's XI, seven for 47 in the first of two games with Gentlemen of England, seven for 84 against Yorkshire, and seven for 82 at Bradford against the Players.

In nineteen matches for Australia against England he took 36 wickets and scored runs. During his three visits to England Garrett's highest innings was 59 against Northumberland in ; at Sydney in his 51 not out contributed largely to Australia beating England by six runs.

In his 35th year, when the Sheffield Shield was instituted in , he appeared for New South Wales in only seventeen competition matches, scoring runs, highest innings , average Born at Woolongong, near Sydney, on July 26, , Garrett was educated at Newington College, Sydney, and at Sydney University, where he earned distinction as a sprinter.

A solicitor by profession, he held the position of Public Trustee in Sydney. On the occasion of his diamond wedding celebration on March 25, , the M. A member of the Winchester XI, to , he played a lot of cricket in Ceylon, where he was a tea planter. He captained Clifton in , his second season in the XI, and played for Gloucestershire from to without doing anything of note, though at school he opened the batting and showed good free style.

He played Rugby football for Gloucestershire. A very good all-round cricketer for the Hornsey club, of which he became president, he played for Middlesex Second XI and was on the County Club committee.

Of high fame in the Lawn Tennis world, he enjoyed success at many games, and if able to give more time to cricket would have taken a prominent place among fast bowlers over fifty years ago. After captaining the Britannia training ship cricket XI, he played in turn for Middlesex, Hertfordshire and Leicestershire, while for the Gentlemen at the Oval in he took five wickets for runs in the two Players innings of a drawn match.

At Boston in he took ten wickets for 15 runs against Fifteen of Massachusetts during the second tour of America he made with teams captained by Lord Hawke. At Cannes he played golf with great skill, notably when beating Harold Hilton in in a club match. Swimming, pigeon-shooting and billiards afforded Hillyard opportunities to win prizes, besides the many honours that came to him on the tennis courts.

For many years he acted in official capacities at Wimbledon. For Winchester against Eton in he took seven wickets for 26, but C. Hambro excelled with seven for 6 runs, and Winchester were all out for 24, J.

Clay, well known with Glamorgan, making 7 and Huband 3, doing next best, extras being top figure 9. He also took five Charterhouse wickets for Next year Huband scored 21 in a total of 58 against Harrow, the only other double figure being 10, and took three wickets. Winchester beat Eton that season by 54 runs, Huband dismissing two men for His captains were Gilbert and Hubert Ashton. Going up to Cambridge after the last war, Huband played in cricket trials, but gave most of his spare time to Real Tennis, at which he represented the University, and racquets.

He also performed finely in these games in championship competitions in America, and represented Canada at squash racquets. Hunter was a keen club cricketer and an enthusiastic follower of the game.

He was an all-round sportsman. During three visits to England in the course of seven years his great pace caused many a collapse on hard pitches, but on soft turf he earned less reward, as was natural enough in our variable climate. Still, he took wickets in , in , and 71 in at an average cost of 19 runs apiece in the three tours. As a fresh opponent our batsmen experienced difficulty in timing his expresses, particularly on turf which tended to make the ball lift. His first effort in England was rewarded by the dismissal of W.

He gained a still better analysis, eight wickets for 39 runs, against an England XI at Crystal Palace, the last four wickets falling to him without cost, but on that occasion the beaten batsmen were of far less class. He proved specially effective against Yorkshire, dismissing six men for 74 in an innings at Sheffield and seven for 36 runs at Leeds. Four wickets for 13 at the Oval and six for 33 at Edgbaston helped in decisive victories for Harry Trott's team over Surrey and Warwickshire, but in the three Tests his record showed only six wickets at For South Australia at Adelaide against A.

Stoddart's side in March he took 14 wickets at a cost of runs, his victims including such famous batsmen as K. That performance remains a record against an England team on the Adelaide Oval.

His test match work in that tour earned 22 wickets at Noble with 26 wickets at Three years later, when Joe Darling for the second time led Australia to victory over England, Jones declined in form and his three wickets in Test matches cost runs, but that season of wet weather told against fast bowlers generally.

Among his best performances, besides those mentioned already, were six wickets for 15 at Melbourne against Victoria and seven for against New South Wales at Adelaide, both in Altogether in nineteen matches against England his full return was 60 wickets at an average cost of Besides his right-arm deadliness with the ball, Jones fielded splendidly at mid-off.

Some good judges thought there was never a superior in that position, and as a hard-hitting batsman he sometimes did good service late in an innings; but it is as a bowler that Jones remains in one's memory.

Rather below medium height and of very powerful build, Jones put all his bodily strength behind the delivery after a comparatively short run for a fast bowler, and the intense force often made the ball rise unpleasantly for the batsman, especially if pitched at all short. Although his action came in for criticism, it went through the tour unchallenged, but in the Australian season of James Philips, himself an Australian, who played for Middlesex, twice no-balled Jones for throwing when playing against A.

Phillips as a resolute umpire took a prominent part in stopping the epidemic of doubtful delivery in England. Subsequently Jones reduced his run, concentrated on length and ball control with good effect. When Jones first came to England, W. Sir Stanley Jackson, in his article on fast bowlers, in the early part of the book, deals specially with Ernest Jones.

Three years he played in the Uppingham XI, being captain in and During the autumn he resigned the position owing to bad health, but did not live long enough to realise the full appreciation of his services as shown by the response to the testimonial raised in recognition of the high regard in which he was held.

John's College, Hurstpierpoint, where he played in the cricket XI, the football team, and was captain of Fives. From to he appeared at intervals for Kent, showing himself a skilful batsman, notably on slow pitches, and fielding with dash and certainty. Strong in forward play and driving, he enjoyed special success in , making at Blackheath against Somerset, and against Surrey at the Oval, where he and J.

Mason put on for the fourth wicket in minutes. Abel and Brockwell surpassed this effort with in an unfinished opening stand which raised the aggregate of the match to 1,, including five centuries, for 30 wickets. His only appearance for Sussex was in against Northamptonshire, scores of 37 and 29 affording further evidence of his ability. Could he have given more time to cricket, he might have been a leading amateur batsman. He made many runs for Gentelmen of Sussex.

Master of the Brighton foot beagles during several years, he also used his untiring efforts for many winters in organising, with A. Gilligan and Maurice Tate, whist drives and dances on behalf of the County Club funds. His happy manner helped in the enjoyment of the Sussex weeks, and his influence went far towards county cricket being a success at Worthing. At Lord's against Rugby, in the second match between these schools, he made 4 run out and 10; earlier in the season at Cheltenham he scored 35 in a total of 84 and That was the first meeting of Cheltenham and Marlborough.

In each game Longhurst was on the losing side. When at Pembroke College, Oxford, he showed to advantage in several sports and won the hurdles in and During his first curacy at Savernake he was classical master at Marlborough to For over fifty years he took a prominent part in philanthropic work in Worcester, and, after being an honorary canon, he became Canon Emeritus of Worcester Cathedral in when 97 years of age. At the time of his death Canon Longhurst was the oldest clergyman in Britain, the oldest member of Oxford University, and senior Old Marlburian.

Sporting Editor of The Times , he reported all games and made a great name as racing correspondent. At Felsted School he played cricket with some success, but showed his best skill in the hockey field, as he did when at Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, until concentrating more on golf.

During the war he served with the R. In the present war he acted as war correspondent with the Royal Navy in the Mediterranean until invalided home in June Having recovered, he continued his energetic journalism until death occurred suddenly at his home. A very keen supporter of Kent cricket, he was always on the St.

Lawrence ground during Canterbury Week, notably at The Buffs tent, having been Colonel-in-chief of the regiment for a long time. He was a barrister. In the big schools match at Lord's he was on the losing side each year, the coaching of R. Mitchell giving great strength to Eton at that time. In the first and third of these matches Eton batted only once, but in Macan, who opened the Harrow bowling, took five wickets at the same very slight cost of 25 runs in each Eton innings.

As Macan scored 25 not out and 17, he was largely responsible for Harrow gaining a first innings lead and losing by only 21 runs. He did not bowl for Cambridge at Lord's, where Oxford won by an innings and 92 runs in , but next year by the narrow margin of six runs, the smallest by which Oxford ever won and the closest result of all in the University matches apart from the Cobden's hat-trick finish which enabled Cambridge to win by two runs.

Macan was the last survivor of the University Matches in which he played, but F. MacKinnon, the Mackinnon of Clan Mackinnon, the sole survivor of that historic struggle, remains the oldest living Blue and Test match player at the age of Born at Hyson Green on October 27, , he made a name as a capable batsman with Notts Castle Club, but did not play for the County until , when 36 years old.

He was not successful in two matches for a side rich in batting, but was chosen to manage the ground staff in , when Nottinghamshire adopted the club and ground scheme for fostering local talent, of which Mr. Marshall possessed special knowledge.

As expected by the County Committee, the young professionals derived great benefit under his able supervision, and he held the position for twenty-five years. Subsequently he earned higher and more widely known fame as chief groundsman at Trent Bridge, where, under his care, the pitches and the whole playing area became a cause for admiration by all cricket lovers--except perhaps bowlers unable to derive any help from the turf. Marshall retired to well-earned rest at the end to the season when over 80 years of age, and passed away near to the ground which he knew during nearly all his long life.

He played golf for the county and was a good three-quarter back in the Norfolk Rugby fifteen. He headed the Westminster School averages with Surrey were beaten by an innings and 20 runs, and the other game was ruined by rain. A free, hard-hitting batsman, he fielded finely in the deep, earning fame as a sure catch.

He also was good behind the stumps, and it was as wicket-keeper that he received his trial for Middlesex. Taking a more prominent part in Association football, he kept goal four times for England against Scotland, to , and in three matches against Wales. He excelled for Old Westminsters and Corinthians. Of medium height and rather slim, eccentric in character and in action, he brought every known device besides his own special jugglery into his right-arm bowling.

For variations of pace and spin he ranked with the cleverest of attackers, his high-pitched very slow ball being specially deceptive. He chiefly used the off-break, but overdid experiments, so that the most experienced captain found it difficult to place a field able to check run-getting when punishing batsmen faced Parkin.

Yet a well-known amateur said in Oval pavilion that he would like Parkin on his side because he took wickets quickly and left his batsmen plenty of time in which to get runs. League cricket occupied much of Parkin's time before he started for Lancashire by taking 14 Leicestershire wickets at Liverpool in , and after the last war his Saturdays were engaged similarly; but in at Old Trafford he helped materially in the defeat of Yorkshire by taking 14 wickets at exactly 10 runs apiece, the margin, curiously enough, being runs--precisely the number hit off Parkin in 60 overs.

Chosen for The Players at the Oval and Lord's, he did nothing exceptional, but next season at the Oval he dismissed nine Gentlemen, six clean bowled, in the first innings for 85 runs, a performance which influenced his choice for the team which visited Australia that winter.

Except at Adelaide, where five wickets fell to him for 60 runs in the first innings, Parkin, like other England bowlers during that ill-fated tour, suffered severely in the Tests; but he took most wickets, and 73 at 21 runs apiece during the whole campaign. Next summer he again proved the most effective bowler when appearing in four of the five Tests, but England were still far below their best, and altogether Parkin was on the losing side eight times without knowing the satisfaction of victory when playing for his country against Australia.

Of the drawn match at Old Trafford, where he took five wickets for 38 runs, he told a story well suited to his own character. Collins, the Australian, batted seven hours for 40 runs. He was in the eleven which beat South Africa by an innings and 18 runs at Edgbaston in Arthur Gilligan, six wickets for 7 runs, and Maurice Tate, four for 12, dismissed the visitors for the lowest Test match total--and again shared the honours when South Africa following-on, scored Parkin was at his best about that time, being the most effective Lancashire bowler both in and the following season, with records of wickets at His deadliness declined in , when his analysis showed wickets at MacDonald and Richard Tyldesley were then his superiors in the powerful Lancashire attack.

In he played in eleven county matches, taking 36 wickets at Altogether in first-class cricket Parkin was credited with 1, wickets at an average cost of As a batsman he was useful at times and showed good style, but his average of Parkin told his early cricket life in a very vivacious book and, in conformity with his cricket gestures, was a conjurer of no mean ability. Born on February 18, , he was Over six feet tall and of slim build, he batted in good style and bowled right-arm medium-pace.

For Haverford College and Pennsylvania University he made a name when young and played for Germanstown Club when only fifteen. He came to England with the Gentleman of Phildelphia team in and, scoring runs, average In he captained a similar side, and with 33 was second in the averages, his chief innings being at Trent Bridge against Nottinghamshire.

In America he played many big innings, the highest being Four times he exceeded a thousand runs in a season, and in , besides making 1, average 50 , he took wickets at 7. Bohlen, who passed away in December , Patterson made for the first wicket against Frank Mitchell's University team that visited Philadelphia in A defensive batsman and good field, he made a name as a left-hand slow bowler, playing six times for Kent in and , besides getting his Blue at Oxford in when Cambridge won by seven wickets--the first of four consecutive results by the same margin, Oxford in varying the run of Cambridge victories.

At Maidstone in he took five Derbyshire wickets for twelve runs, and in for St. Lawrence he dismissed seven Dover batsmen, three bowled and four caught, in seven balls, as recorded in Scores and Biographies. From to he helped his county with steadily increasing value during a long period when Nottinghamshire stood out as an exceptionally strong side.

Starting modestly in , he became the regular number five in the batting order, and after the last war he rivalled W. Whyshall for preference as the most consistent run-getter in the team.

In he scored 1, with an average of Twice he assisted Nottinghamshire to win the championship--in under A. Jones and in when A. A strained thigh handicapped Payton during this second triumph with which he was associated, but he came out second in the averages to Whysall, his batting at the age of 46 earning high praise; he did especially well against Lancashire at Trent Bridge, making , the highest score of his career, during which he hit 39 centuries.

Payton and George Gunn were then the only remaining members of the side who helped to carry off the championship twenty-two years before. Next season, , illness, as in some previous seasons, handicapped Payton, but he maintained his form in this his benefit year, which practically ended his first-class cricket, for he played little in and then retired.

Altogether he scored 22, runs for the county with an average of Of rather frail build, Wilfred Payton batted in excellent style with a wide range of well-controlled strokes, and he fielded admirably. Usually steady in defence and orthodox stroke play, he could score freely when time was important. In at Huddersfield he hit 63 out of 78 in 55 minutes off the Yorkshire bowlers, and next season he made 50 out of 70 in 48 minutes at Worksop against Derbyshire.

His son, the Rev. Payton, played for the county and got his Blue at Cambridge in An admirable bat at Marlborough, he made 30 and 47 against Rugby at Lord's in the match, when C.

Bengough, by going on to bowl twice at each end in the same innings, broke law This infringement, which caused the law to be altered, was mentioned in Wisden in regard to S.

Poynton, highest Marlborough scorer in an effort to get runs for victory, was batting with his captain when the incident occurred. Rugby won by 36 runs after a splendid struggle. Poynton played for Somerset from to when free from medical duties, and in he took part in another match that aroused much discussion. On a very wet Thursday morning it was decided that play was impossible; but the weather turned fine, many people came to Taunton to see the Australians, and to avoid disappointment the Somerset authorities over ruled the umpires and play began late in the afternoon.

Poynton's highest score for Somerset was 57 at Hove in An exceptionally capable player of many games, he might have gained high honours at cricket if less proficient at Rugby football, hockey and water polo, in each of which sports he represented Oxford during his University career form to He played Rugby wing forward and hockey centre-half for England. Appearing in Oxford cricket trails form , he scored retired when captaining a team of Freshmen in , but when tried in the Eleven he did nothing of moment, and never seemed likely to get his Blue, but he was awarded the Harlequin cap and became a member of Free Foresters.

Quaife, who died at his home at Norwood, Surrey, on January 18, aged 78, was an opening batsman of much ability, possessed of excellent style and attractive hitting power. Born at Newhaven on April 1, , he first appeared for Sussex in , and continued to assist his home county until halfway through the summer of , when, questioned by the committee as to whether he was qualifying for Warwickshire, he refused all information and was consequently dropped form the side.

He made 3, runs for Sussex with an average of nearly 19, highest score not out against Gloucestershire at Brighton in In this most disastrous season for Sussex--eleven of twelve championship engagements ending in defeat--he headed the batting averages. In he turned out for Warwickshire--at that time one of seven teams competing for the second-class counties championship. He at once showed himself an acquistion, making runs with an average of 31, helped Warwickshire reach first-class rank in , when he headed the averages with 37, and kept this place in the eleven for eight years, dropping out early in For Warwickshire during those seasons he scored 6, runs, averaged 26, and put together ten three-figure innings, of which the highest was against Gloucestershire in He finished his county career with Suffolk in Three times he appeared for the Players against the Gentlemen and thoroughly justified his selection, scoring 42 not out and 59 at the Oval in , 55 on the same ground in , and 40 not out at Lord's in Although of only moderate height, he was four inches taller than his brother William.

In his official capacity he scored the first-wicket record of made by Herbert Sutcliffe and Percy Holmes at Leyton in June , and was on duty at Hove on September 1, , when the only county cricket concluded that day, before the crisis stopped first-class cricket, brought victory to Yorkshire by nine wickets over Sussex in James Parks benefit match. The bowling analysis of the Sussex second innings, showing the last performance by Hedley Verity overs 1 maiden 9 runs 7 wickets--written by Ringrose, was kept by Major Brian Sellers, and found in his blazer pocket at Lord's when the sad news of Captain Verity's death was announced.

Besides these historic events, Ringrose placed on paper many remarkable performances during the seasons from to Yorkshire started and finished that period as champion county and altogether took chief honours ten times, with Ringrose chronicling in the score-book all that happened. He brought practical knowledge to bear on this work, having played for the county occasionally from to , and would have found more opportunities to show his worth but for the presence of Sir Stanley Jackson, George Hirst, Wilfred Rhodes and Schofield Haigh in the Yorkshire XI during those years.

In , his best season, he took 73 wickets at 19 runs apiece, excelling against the Australians at Bradford by dismissing nine men at a cost of 76 runs in the first innings.

Described as one of the first bowlers to develop the out-swinger, Ringrose said that this ball led to a fieldsman being placed in the gully.

Bowled at the stumps and swinging away it caused batsmen much trouble. Among other bowlers who profited by his advice was William Bowes, so valuable to Yorkshire for several seasons before the war. Before playing for Yorkshire, Ringrose was on the staff of the Liverpool club at Aigburth, and after finishing his county experience he enjoyed marked success in Scotland for several years. After playing a little for Middlesex, he was actively associated with Hampshire from to , captaining the county in four seasons, to A useful wicket-keeper, he went to America with K.

Ranjitsinhji's team in , and in was deputy to A. MacLaren's side in Australia. Then 42 years of age, he did not play in any Test match. In he appeared for Gentlemen against Players at the Oval. Often playing a good innings, he scored 52 out of added with Captain J. Greig for Hampshire against Lancashire at Liverpool in Greig scored without being dismissed in a match that was always an uphill fight for his side, and, thanks to his efforts, was drawn.

Tall and of robust build, Robson hit hard besides showing skill in defence. During those eighteen seasons he scored 1, runs and took wickets, among the opposing sides being Essex, Derbyshire, Hampshire, Leicestershire and Northants.

When still playing well he started umpiring, and until was on the list of Minor Counties umpires. For forty years he acted as coach to Norwich Grammar School. He died at his daughter's house at Norwich on January 6, aged Accurate length with slow to medium-paced spin delivery enabled Rye to keep batsmen on the defensive.

Lacey made not out for Hampshire in still the highest score in a Minor County match-- Rye bowled 33 overs, 14 maidens, for 77 runs and four wickets. Against Essex at Norwich in his figures read: In , his most successful season, he took wickets in championship matches at He bowled fast right-hand with off-break and showed to most advantage on hard turf.

He often lacked effective help, but once at least, this misfortune did not spoil his work. In at the Oval he took nine wickets for 83 runs, hitting the stumps six times, an so enabled Leicestershire to atone for a poor first innings and win by 63 runs, Surrey suffering their second defeat at the Oval in their last match of the season. Strangely enough, in the second dismissal of Surrey Shipman did not earn any reward. In he did the hat-trick against Derbyshire.

Twice he excelled against Yorkshire; in at Leeds he took their first five wickets for 12 runs, and Jayes dismissed seven men for 87 runs in the second innings, the two fast bowlers being mainly responsible for a victory by runs-- Leicestershire's first triumph over Yorkshire in a championship match. Next year, at Leicester, Shipman got rid of seven opponents for 73, and with King, the slow right-hander--eight wickets for brought about the defeat of Yorkshire by an innings and 20 runs, the only win for Leicestershire that season.

The war brought his county cricket career to an end, though he played once in Altogether he took wickets, average Key, died at Sedbergh, Yorkshire, where he lived since his retirement from coach at the school, on December 3, aged Born at Bury St. Edmund's, he obtained a trial at the Oval on the recommendation of C. Baldwin, a Surrey professional also of Suffolk by birth, and when qualified by residence played from to and made subsequent appearances, while playing also for the London County Club under W.

A rather slow left-handed bowler, he afforded the perfect contrast to Tom Richardson and William Lockwood, then in their prime, and such success did they achieve that, thanks mainly to them, Surrey were champions in and Smith enjoyed by far his most successful season in , when his average showed 95 wickets at At Cheltenham Smith twice dismissed W.

Grace, and against Gloucestershire at the Oval, where Surrey also won by an innings, he and Tom Richardson bowled unchanged, equally sharing the wickets, Smith's ten costing 71 runs and Richardson's In Richardson stood out by himself with wickets, Smith deteriorating to a modest 40 at 24 runs apiece in championship matches and he never recovered his ability of During a short cricket career he earned lasting fame as the hero in a record performance by Oxford in the University match of Left to get runs, the eleven, captained by H.

Leveson Gower, gained a glorious victory; the feat of making so many runs surpassing anything previously accomplished in University contests.

Smith, going in second wicket down, scored and with only two wanted gave an easy catch to slip when attempting the winning hit. Apart form this wonderful accomplishment the match lives in cricket history because it produced similar incidents to those of Cambridge again conceding runs so as to avoid making the batting side follow-on. As the outcome of each of these occurrences in University matches, the M. Cambridge won when F.

Wells to bowl so as to give away extras; but three years later success did not attend the scheme of Frank Mitchell, the captain, and E. Shine, the fast bowler, who sent down two no-balls and a wide, all of which went to the boundary. Cambridge batted again ahead, but were so unnerved by the hostile attitude of the crowd and the loudly expressed criticism in the pavilion, with shouts of Play the game and It's not cricket, that six of their strong batting side fell for 61 runs.

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